SHARE

Ginseng hunting has become even more popular the last few years after television shows portray ginseng hunters making tens of thousands of dollars every fall.

Ginseng root sells upwards of $1,000 per pound some years. This has caused for a decline in wild ginseng, but for the do-it-yourself types, planting wild simulated ginseng is profitable and enjoyable.

Many people believe that the only ginseng that’s available to dig and sell is wild ginseng. It is true that wild ginseng is the most valuable, but there are other types of ginseng that can be harvested and sold.

Farmed ginseng is grown in beds like vegetables. Some use chemicals and unnatural methods to grow ginseng under imitation shade; these farmers know the age of the roots in every bed before they dig them. The ginseng is not wild, so they’re able to pre-set their prices every season because they’re farm-raised. Therefore, they know the prices before season.

Woods-grown ginseng is slightly better ginseng than farmed, because it’s grown under the natural forest canopy. This ginseng may be fertilized or grown using tilled soil or chemicals. The seed is planted and not wild-sown, and so the harvesters know the year and age of every bed and can pre-determine prices.

Wild simulated is the best of these three options, and most likely will have been growth without chemicals or tilled ground. The overall quality is better. This ginseng can also be aged with accuracy, as one knows how much seed was planted and when it was planted.

Ginseng root sells upwards of $1,000 per pound some years. This has caused for a decline in wild ginseng, but for the do-it-yourself types, planting wild simulated ginseng is profitable and enjoyable. Watch this video to learn how to plant wild simulated ginseng.

SOURCEYouTube
SHARE
Previous articleThis Bald Eagle is a Master of Improvisation [VIDEO]
Next articleHow Possums Help Prevent Lyme Disease
Jason Houser is an avid traditional bowhunter from Central Illinois who killed his first deer when he was nine years old. A full-time freelance writer since 2008, he has written for numerous national hunting magazines. Jason has hunted big game in 12 states with his bow, but his love will always be white-tailed deer and turkeys. He considers himself lucky to have a job he loves and a family who shares his passion for the outdoors. Jason writes full time and is on the pro staff of two archery companies; in his free time, he fishes and traps as much as possible.

LEAVE A REPLY